Top 10 Programming Languages for 2018 – 2019

Top 10 Programming Languages for 2018 – 2019

Top 10 programming language lists are a popular additive to the software development culture.  Each year, various sites add to and influence the collective opinion of software developers everywhere. 

I’m always excited to see what is trending and what is fading.  Since 2010 or thereabouts, JavaScript has grown to new heights both with frontend frameworks and with its addition of backend development and the inclusion of even more frameworks for the server side.

Also, since about 2014, Apple’s Objective C, for example, once extremely popular and highly sought after by employers has slipped down, and off in many cases, of the radar in favor of Swift.

Being up one year and down the next is part of the technology landscape.  Some languages sparkle then fade, some shine for decades. 

As a software lifer and long term consultant, I propose that you focus on the language or languages that are going to get you paid and keep companies seeking your skillset. 

In this article, I will present the Motivated Code Pro Top 10 programing languages for 2018 and 2019.  In addition to my list, I have included a summary of Top 10 lists from 10 other popular software related websites.


It is very interesting to see the similarities in the lists but also the differences.  I’ll leave you in suspense as to what those are and jump into the Motivated Code Pro Top 10.

Motivated Code Pro Top 10!

10 – C

C is still very widely used.  Not essential to web development but there continues to be a lot of work for C developers.   C is used for embedded systems, operating systems, development of new languages, and graphics and games. 

9 – C++

C++ is a super set of C.  A little broader audience in terms of jobs.  C++ is also used in embedded systems, games, graphics, web browsers, medical and engineering applications.

C and C++ have been used for scripting MySQL, one of the most widely used database management systems. C and C++ based software help form the backbone of various database-based enterprises, such as Google, Wikipedia, Yahoo and YouTube – to name a few.

8 – Swift

When it comes to mobile development, Swift is the first thing Apple wants developers to learn.  With Objective C on the way down in terms of popularity, Swift is said to be Objective C with out the C.  No memory management and no pointers.

Some good examples of mobile apps built with Swift: Firefox iOS, WordPress for iOS, Swift Radio – an open source radio station app, PixPic – a photo editing app – to name a few. 

7 – PHP

In existence since 1994, PHP continues to be incredibly widely used.  Big time sites like Facebook, Wikipedia, Tumblr and last but certainly not least, every WordPress site on planet earth was built with PHP.

PHP has lots of popular frameworks including Laravel, Phalcon, Symfony, CodeIgniter, Zend. 

This is a good time to add my theory about frameworks:  for every 3 problems a framework solves, it introduces 1.  Still a very good deal and certainly speeds development and helps build to a standard but not a panacea.

6 – Python

Python is generally easy to learn and incredibly flexible.  Born in 1991, Python has a design philosophy that emphasizes code readability, notably using lots of whitespace, making it easy to look at.

Python is used for web development, GUI development, scientific and numeric programming, good old fashioned business software development, and systems administration.

5 – C#

Micorosoft’s answer to Java.  What’s more though is that the Microsoft stack, including C#, .NET framework, SQL Server, Visual Studio, and Foundation Server are all beautifully integrated. 

There are tons of companies using C# and of course there are tons of jobs for C# developers, not to mention and endless list of applications built with C# and processes that will ultimately be built with C# in the future.

4 – Java

Java is one of my personal favorites and is still, by most counts, the most widely used programming language on the planet. 

Business applications, web applications, application frameworks like Spring and Hibernate, and integrated systems are just a sample of what gets done with Java.  Your refrigerator or car stereo system might be run on Java. 

There will be lots of Java jobs for the foreseeable future.  I certified as a Java Programmer with Sun Microsystems back in May of 2000 and I have never struggled to find work as a Java contractor or consultant.  That was after a fairly long career as an AS/400 RPG programmer. 

3 – JavaScript for the backend

Up until the past few years, JavaScript was thought of as an exclusively frontend language.  However, thanks to the flexibility and speed of JavaScript, it has been widely adopted via node.js as an extremely viable backend language option. 

Popular frameworks have been built for it including Express.js, LoopBack, Meteor.js, and Hapi.js to list just a small sample.  Additionally NoSQL databases like MongoDB and CouchDB  are widely used practical alternatives to traditional enterprise SQL databases. 

2 – JavaScript for the frontend

An entire post and video could be done on JavaScript frameworks both for the frontend and for the backend.  Programming with JavaScript for the frontend is pretty analogous to programming JavaScript through a framework. 

There are a lot of really good frameworks including React, Angular and its various versions, Ext JS (my personal favorite), Vue.js, Ember to list just a few from the groundswell of frontend frameworks.

You can’t go wrong with any of the frameworks listed here.  The momentum of JavaScript is unparalleled and shows no signs of slowing.  If you don’t know a JavaScript framework and you work in web development then it is time to learn one.  Even if you consider yourself more of a backend developer, you need to do this!

This is important and goes a long way toward keeping you paid. 

1 – The language you work in today!

I meant for this to be a bit counterintuitive.  I think most of us peruse these lists looking for what the rest of the world thinks is the next big thing. 

I am no exception. 

No one wants to feel like the choices they’ve made suck, rather we want to feel like the languages we’ve committed to are viable and thriving; that corporations (should be read as “customers” and “employers”) are investing in the things you have expertise in.  

On the other hand, if we determine that the world is moving away from our primary skill then we need to start learning something new immediately. 

Motivated Code Pro is devoted to improving the careers of software development professionals everywhere, with a particular emphasis on consulting and contract programming.  As such, my desire for you is to honor the language(s) you work in today by going deeper with what is getting you paid right now.  This is valuable to you and to your customers and employers. 

Don’t miss an opportunity to sharpen the skills that are already money for you. 

This is important.

At the same time, I think you should spend 30 minutes every work day with what you feel is the next skill to learn.  This is also important.  Choose just one.  Choosing multiple new languages is a fast-track to being overwhelmed.  Working on one new skill for 30 minutes a day may not seem like much but over time it will add up.  You will get better at it and you will be able to apply it successfully.

That wraps up the Motivated Code Pro Top 10. 

In this next section, I provide a brief summary of the op 10 from each of the 10 websites shown above.  I also included a relevant quote from each site that provides some insight into their thought process.

Stack Overflow

Stack Overflow's Top 10 Article

The link above takes you to the most popular technologies section of Stack Overflow’s posting but within the article as a whole there is a ton of valuable information to be consumed.  In the interest of space, time and the focus of my article, I have included just the Top 10 “Programming Scripting and Markup Languages.”  However, Stack Overflow’s list contains 25 entries on their programming, scripting and markup languages list. 

According to Stack Overflow:

For the sixth year in a row, JavaScript is the most commonly used programming language. Python has risen in the ranks, surpassing C# this year, much like it surpassed PHP last year. Python has a solid claim to being the fastest-growing major programming language.

Stack Overflow


Here is a quick look Stack Overflow's Top 10:

  1. JavaScript
  2. HTML
  3. SQL
  4. Java
  5. Bash/Shell
  6. Python
  7. C#
  8. PHP
  9. C++
  10. C

FreeCodeCamp

FreeCodeCamp's Top 10 Article

According to FreeCodeCamp:

This is not a “top hottest languages” post throwing around a bunch of names and buzzwords.


This is an objective and practical review of the current state, tendencies, and safe near-future predictions of the IT industry at the start of 2018.


It’s based on statistical data from various trusted sources and is the result of a two-week period of in-depth research.

FreeCodeCamp


Note that each entry on FreeCodeCamp’s list also provides:

  • The TIOBE Rating
  • GitHub Octoverse rating based on GitHub pull requests
  • US Salary numbers from Indeed.com
  • US and World Salary on StackOverFow

Here is a quick look at FreeCodeCamp’s Top 10.

  1. JavaScript
  2. Swift
  3. Python
  4. Java
  5. C++
  6. Ruby
  7. Rust
  8. Elixir
  9. Scala
  10. R

Hacker Noon

Hacker Noon's Top 10 Article

According to Hacker Noon:

Programming is something vast and rather individual as each developer chooses tools that are most convenient for them. However, certain languages, platforms and frameworks have claimed themselves as one of the easiest and most efficient to use. Thus we have collected for you top-10 programming languages loved by developers nowadays.

Enter your text here...

Hacker Noon


Here is a quick look at Hacker Noon’s Top 10:

  1. Python
  2. C
  3. Java
  4. C++
  5. C#
  6. R
  7. JavaScript
  8. PHP
  9. Go
  10. Swift

TIOBE Index for June 2018

TIOBE's Index's Top 10 Article

According to TIOBE:

The TIOBE Programming Community index is an indicator of the popularity of programming languages. The index is updated once a month. The ratings are based on the number of skilled engineers world-wide, courses and third party vendors. Popular search engines such as Google, Bing, Yahoo!, Wikipedia, Amazon, YouTube and Baidu are used to calculate the ratings. It is important to note that the TIOBE index is not about the best programming language or the language in which most lines of code have been written.

Tiobe



TIOBE is particularly interesting in that it includes a Top 100 programming languages, it reflects changes in popularity from month to month and year to year, additionally it includes a Very Long Term History and a Programing Language Hall of Fame.

Nevertheless, here is a quick look the TIOBE Top 10 for June 2018:

  • Java
  • C
  • C++
  • Python
  • C#
  • Visual Basic .NET
  • PHP
  • JavaScript
  • SQL
  • R

PrepAway

PrepAways' Top 10 Article

According to the PrepAway article:

This article is to make you aware of the current trend in programming languages, which language is in demand and how does know a programming language affect your prospects.

PrepAway



PrepAway also includes a level of difficulty, with 1 being the least difficult and 5 being the most difficult. 

Here is a quick look at the PrepAway Top 10:

  • Python (Difficulty 1)
  • PHP (Difficulty 2)
  • Ruby (Difficulty 2)
  • JavaScript (Difficulty 2)
  • C (Difficulty 3)
  • C# (Difficulty 3)
  • Java (Difficulty 3)
  • Objective-C (Difficulty 3)
  • SQL (Difficulty 3)
  • C++ (Difficulty 5)

TechRepublic

TechRepublic's Top 10 Article

TechRepublic’s list is interesting in that it rates not just the Top 10 programming languages, rather it rates the Top 10 programming languages and in demand skills. 

With that in mind, according to TechRepublic:

Open source has become the industry model for practical software development, and its commercial success has been driven in part by adoption from large tech companies such as IBM and Oracle. Walmart and Verizon also rely on open source programs, and host their own open source projects.

TechRepublic



Here is a quick look at TechRebublic’s Top 10 programming languages and in demand skills:

  1. Java
  2. Python
  3. Git
  4. JavaScript
  5. Node.js
  6. Docker
  7. AngularJS
  8. Jenkins
  9. Amazon Web Services (AWS)
  10. Agile

Note that only Java, Python an JavaScript are actual programming languages.   The remainder are frameworks or in demand technologies according to TechRepublic. 

gitconnected

gitconnected's Top 10 Article

According to gitconnected:

Investing your time into a language is always a risky. Of course we do it because we love it, but what makes it even better is finding real-life opportunities to use what we learned. We all wish we could learn everything, but if you focus on the languages in this list, it will ensure that you are adding tools to your skill set that will be used for years to come.

gitconnected



Here is a quick look at gitconnected’s top programming languages to learn in 2018:

  1. TypeScript
  2. Go
  3. Python
  4. Kotlin + Swift
  5. SQL
  6. Rust
  7. Elixir

InformationWeek

InformationWeek's Top 10 Article

According to InformationWeek:

While programming language popularity is fleeting, knowing how to solve algorithms will always remain one of the most important programming skills. "This is why we put such strong emphasis in learning algorithms at Coding Dojo," Misirlakis said. The languages may come and go, but the ability to problem-solve will always be in demand, he explained. "Aspiring and existing developers must learn coding’s common building blocks and ultimately become fluent in multiple languages to have the adaptability and flexibility for a successful career."

InformationWeek


Here is a quick look at InformationWeek’s 10 most in-demand programming languages of 2018:

  1. Java
  2. Python
  3. JavaScript
  4. C++
  5. C#
  6. PHP
  7. Perl
  8. Swift
  9. R
  10. Rust

Simple Programmer

Simple Programmer's Top 10 Article

According to Simple Programmer:

The market will tell you what the trending programming languages are for the future. We must be aware of the trends and watching the news and the rise of new technology so we can adjust the sails on which programming languages to learn, especially in 2018 with a lot of new things coming up.

Simple Programmer



Here is a quick look at Simple Programmer’s Top 10:

  1. JavaScript
  2. Python
  3. C#
  4. Java
  5. PHP
  6. Go
  7. Swift
  8. Rust
  9. Kotlin
  10. C & C++

Coding DoJo

Coding Dojo Top Languages Article

According to Coding Dojo:

Software development is a dynamic field. New and in-demand programming languages, frameworks and technologies can emerge, rise to fame, and then fade away in the course of a few years. Developers need to constantly be learning new skills to stay relevant.

Coding DoJo



It’s worth noting that Coding Dojo’s list is based on job postings. 

A quick look at Coding Dojo’s 7 Most In-Demand Programming Languages of 2018:

  1. Java
  2. Python
  3. JavaScript
  4. C++
  5. C#
  6. PHP
  7. Perl

**** Top 10 Matrix at a Glance

Website      

10

9

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

Motivated Code Pro

C

C++

Swift

PHP

Python

C#

Java

Frontend JavaScript

Backend JavaScript

Your Current Language

Stack Overflow

C

C++

PHP

C#

Python

Bash/Shell

Java

SQL

HTML

JavaScript

FreeCodeCamp

R

Scala

Elixir

Rust

Ruby

C++

Java

Python

Swift

JavaScript

Hacker Noon

Swift

Go

PHP

JavaScript

R

C#

C++

Java

C

Python

TIOBE

R

SQL

JavaScript

PHP

VB.net

C#

Python

C++

C

Java

PrepAway

C++

SQL

Objective-C

Java

C#

C

JavaScript

Ruby

PHP

Python

TechRepublic

Agile

AWS

Jenkins

Angular JS

Docker

Node.js

JavaScript

Git

Python

Java

gitconnected




Elixir

Rust

SQL

Kotlin+

Swift

Python

Go

TypeScript

InformationWeek

Rust

R

Swift

Perl

PHP

C#

C++

JavaScript

Python

Java

Simple Programmer

C & C++

Kotlin

Rust

Swift

Go

PHP

Java

C#

Python

JavaScript

Coding Dojo

 

 


Perl

PHP

C#

C++

JavaScript

Python

Java

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About the Author Scott Salisbury

Scott is the creator of Motivated Code Pro and the Managing Partner of Pinch Hitter Solutions, Inc. Motivated Code Pro is devoted to helping developers build better software careers. Pinch Hitter Solutions (phs4j.com) is a consultancy focused on mobile app development and enterprise web work. Scott works primarily in Java and JavaScript and focuses on Spring and Ext JS.

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